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Once you understand how learning occurs through pictures and associations you will know how to remember everything you read using mental pictures .

The information you “input” into your brain using mental pictures and associations, can be easily retrieved using the same formula. This is called access! Access is better known as memory and you will use this when you learn how to remember everything you read.

Neuroscientists say that our brain works best using mental pictures with association. When you want to learn how to remember everything you read do this as an experiment: Imagine what you were wearing two days ago.

Your brain did one or two things to help you remember and the same will happen if you use pictures and associations to learn how to remember everything you read.

First, you may have accessed a picture of yourself immediately and easily remembered what you were wearing. Or, if you needed to think for a moment, several things may have popped into your mind that you associated with what you were wearing. These would help you recall the exact kind of clothing you had on.

You might have remembered where you were and that triggered your memory. Perhaps you thought of what you were doing whether you had any special reason to wear a certain kind of clothing.

Maybe you remembered how you felt wearing the clothing. These are clues to your brain to use mental images and other learning styles as you learn how to remember everything you read.

All of these things are known as associations. One thing reminded you of another. They were paired up in your brain with something else and voila – you remembered when you made the “connection” or “association” with the pictures and are part of how to remember everything you read.

These mental pictures and associations are what helps you learn how to remember everything you read and you will need to turn the words into mental movies as you read.  This is what excellent readers and speed readers do.

The ancient Greeks and Romans often had elaborate memory contests to impress their fellow men with their “feats.” You can benefit from their system to teach yourself how to remember everything you read using mental pictures.

Over 2,000 years ago they used several systems, all based on associations and pictures, which are validated by brain research today in order to learn how to remember everything you read using mental pictures.

Since our teaching and testing system relies so heavily on what students can recall, teaching memory techniques and a system of how to remember everything you read rewards everyone with better memories and higher self-esteem.

You are actually putting yourself in an empowered “state” for learning and for learning how to remember everything you read.

Therefore, if you are trying to learn how to remember everything you read, you can boost your success by giving yourself reliable, long term strategies.

Here is the first strategy to learn how to remember everything you read using mental pictures.

How to remember everything you read using mental picturesIt is an excerpt from the book, Instant Learning for Amazing Grades.

This strategy is about how to remember things in order and you can use it not only for understanding how to remember everything you read using mental pictures, words in a certain order, but to remember things like a grocery list or other things you have to do in a day in a particular order. you can also use it to understand how to remember everything you read.

Memory Pegs

Look around the room you are in and see if there is a picture hanging on the wall. If so, you can think of a memory peg like the hook in your brain that you will hang what you want to remember on.

This system is reported on and adapted from Colin Rose’s book Accelerated Learning and Tony Buzan’s, Use Both Sides of Your Brain.

 

 

1………Bun……….Mercury

2………Shoe………Venus

3………Tree………Earth

4………Door………Mars

5………Hive………Jupiter

6………Sticks……..Saturn

7………Heaven……Uranus

8………Gate……….Neptune

9………Sign………..Pluto

1. To recall the planets in order, “memorize” the pegs. The pegs are next to the numbers. (Remember – you now know that “memorize” simply means to use pictures and associations like all memory experts do. You’re connecting up those neurons and dendrites in your brain and you have a specific strategy for how to remember everything you read with the associations and things they remind you of.

2. What do you notice about the pegs and the numbers across from them? They rhyme with the numbers they are next to.

3. Then, sit in your “success position” and begin to say the numbers and pegs aloud. 1 Bun, 2 Shoe, 3 Tree, 4 Door, 5 Hive, 6 Sticks, 7 Heaven, 8 Gate, 9 Sign. Repeat the process much louder and again in a whisper as you learn how to remember everything you read.

4. Then close your eyes, hold your head up high, and you say the numbers and the rhyming pegs. You are indeed using a system about how to remember everything you read.

5. Then think of what a bun reminds you of. Be sure you look up into your visual memory position where you remember pictures and get a clear image of the bun. You are easily learning how to remember everything you read.

To verify, ask yourself things like whether the bun has sesame seeds on it? Or, did you think of another kind of bun, like a hot dog bun, a cinnamon sticky bun, or even the buns we sit on, etc.

Whatever it is, create colorful images of the bun and look upward into your visual memory position with the pictures you created. These pictures you create are used to teach yourself how to remember everything you read.

6. Finally, either on a paper or in their visual memory “screen” position, connect both the mercury and the bun together in a single humorous, colorful image. It’s usually best to draw your image in the beginning. Maybe you drew a hamburger bun with a thermometer sticking out of it…but whatever it was, you developed a system to for how to remember everything you read.

Great – now you’re well on your way to learn how to remember everything you read.

Reinforce the memory by placing this image up on a visual memory screen, something like an inner blackboard as you learn how to remember everything you read.

7. Next, close their eyes, and you ask what is planet 1? You will think of 1, the rhyming peg “bun” and see the mercury connected to the bun. You will quickly know that planet 1 is mercury, by recalling the phrase “1 Bun – Mercury”.

Then repeat the process with the other numbers, pegs and associated images. It’s best to review by holding your pictures in your visual memory position, one at a time.

As you draw or place your images in your visual memory location, play some of the Mozart music recommended in Chapter 13 or in the resource section to anchor the learning with another modality. This is another way to learn how to remember everything you read.

After reviewing to see that you know the planets in order, give yourself a written test so you can see if you now know how to remember everything you read.

Have fun with this and remind yourself that they now have a strategy to rely on your magic memory screen. (You’ll be creating a nice brain link so that when you hear the word “test” you will smile – knowing that you now have a strategy to remember things on written tests as well as know how to remember everything you read).

I often use this strategy in my teacher education courses and teachers get to experience first hand how powerful it is when teaching them how to remember everything they read using mental pictures.

Before we begin the exercise, I run around the room asking teachers to tell me, “What is planet 6, what is planet 2, what is planet 8, etc.” I give them very little time to answer and when they don’t know, I assure them that the peg memory strategy above will allow them to know the answers very rapidly for the “test.”

The teachers are amazed at their success. Each one feels certain and can say to the other, Hey, you know how to remember everything you read as well as how to remember things in order.

Note to highly visual learners:

Are you wondering why you would go through these kinds of exercises to learn how to remember everything you read using mental pictures? Are you thinking it might take “too much time?”

Remember that you naturally make associations and pictures in your mind so quickly that you are hardly even aware of it.

This is a time-tested, wonderful way to learn how to remember everything you read.

Part 2: Stay tuned for the number shape system and how to make mental images as you learn to remember everything you read.

pat-wyman Pat Wyman is a reading specialist, corporate spokesperson, university instructor and founder of HowToLearn.com.

She teaches learning styles strategies, and memory strategies on how to remember everything you read using mental pictures. She shows people how to turn words into images as part of her program on how to remember everything you read.

 

Posted by +Pat Wyman, author and founder of HowToLearn.com


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