15 responses to “Did Medication Cause Yet Another School Shooting”

  1. Vinoy

    Hi Pat,
    It is very heart-breaking to see innocent little children as victims of either an accident or a targeted killing.
    While one can speculate on the mental condition of the killer/s and whether medication could have caused it, my opinion is that the easy availability of guns is the prime cause for such murders.
    As long as unsound or perverted people have easy access to such weapons of mass-murder, these killings will continue.
    The only way to halt or stem these occurrences is to remove the general populace’s access to guns. Period.
    Everywhere else in the world, it is very difficult for an individual to obtain a gun. There are specific reasons for being allowed the liberty to purchase and possess a weapon and lengthy procedures involved in getting a weapon.
    Result…..one very rarely sees killings like those occurring again and again in America.
    Any right which impinges on anyone else’s right should not be a right.
    Sincerely,
    Vinoy.

  2. John Schaub

    Dear Pat

    How can one not be enraged by the horror of the latest school shooting in America. But as an observer from far away Australia, I sadly have to report that many people around me simply sigh and reluctantly ask why America chooses to be like this.

    We, in this country, are forever grateful for the many examples of right-living that your great country has given the world since nationhood. Now could be the time for earnest reflection though. Maybe America is somewhat blinded by its enviable successes and fails to notice shortcomings in some worsening affairs. Rightly or wrongly, America is also slightly diminished as a force for moral good when it displays little resolve to find alternative strategies in the face of a tragedy such as this.

    My hope is that you as a prominent author, Pat can influence public discourse and help your fellow countrymen to recapture a vision for your great nation in preference to apportioning blame for occasional ills. This shooting is horrific. However, maybe the answer does not lie in gun control at all, but in your nation’s reverence for success at all costs in preference to a more robust form of comprehensive civic inclusion.

    To paraphrase Maxwell Smart, an American hero of mine, ‘Use America’s energy for good and not evil!’ Change may be uncomfortable, but as America has proven so many times before, it can do anything it sincerely puts its mind to. If it wants to develop a culture more able to identify and nurture the weak, then I am confident it will.

    However, let me emphasize in closing that no nation, no matter how attuned and sensitive to all its citizens has an antidote to irrational evil all the time. Such an expectation would be unrealistic in the extreme and I do not encourage it. One only has to reflect upon the tragic events in Norway to confirm this.

    But please do make an attempt to explain to the world why and in what circumstances it is justified for private citizens to hold more than one firearm and to even have access to automatic weapons. This does seem insane!

    Good luck,

    John Schaub FCSA

  3. Teri

    I liked what Charles Krauthammer said about this tragedy and how Americans will react to it. Americans will make one of three decisions about what caused this event and other recent mass murders:

    1. Cause is mental illness of the murderer.

    2. Cause is popular culture. Meaning violent TV shows and violent video games. This includes poor parenting, nutrition and prescription drugs.

    3. Cause is guns and lack of gun control.

    Some will determine the cause as a combination of the three above reasons. However, most people (especially those who lean extreme right or left) will pick ONE of these three issues and stick to that opinion depending on their previous belief system.

    I definitely sense a softening of the polarization that was created during the election as a result of this terrible event. I feel America has come together similar to how it did after 9/11. I hope this “coming together” can be a beneficial and lasting result of this tragedy. I think it can if people don’t get “stuck” on one of the reasons 1, 2 or 3 listed above.

    Unfortunately the Second Amendment right causes a visceral reaction for people on both sides of the argument and could cause polarization again. Especially if its the only cause chosen to remedy the mass murder problem in our country.

    I would like to see a solution sought that involves all three of the listed causes, each in a moderate way according to their actual contribution to the issue. But of course no one will agree which of the three issues is the biggest part of the problem. If only gun-control is enforced (or guns are banned) a psychopath will just build a fertilizer bomb or apply the “Unabomber” approach to wreak havoc.

    We need to address mental health and start early with the children so they don’t become a product of poor parenting and violent pop culture.

    In short, you need to keep on doing what you’re doing to help our babies grow up on the right track!!! Now is your time and opportunity to get your word out!!!

  4. Leonne Beebe

    Dear Pat,
    Thank you for taking a stand on “medicational malpractice” and the effects of medication on adult behavior. I worked with autistic children in the 70s, and I was very concerned with the use of medication to manage behavior. I now teach adult basic education upgrading at the University of the Fraser Valley. I have had students on medications for mental illness, and I could see the problems they experienced in dealing with life’s situations. You have insight into what happens when the medicated child grows up to be a medicated adult with no natural ability to feel or deal with feelings.

    Please contact Anderson Cooper on CNN. I have been watching his covereage of this tragedy, and he has had speakers talk about gun control, and the role of mental illness in such cases. He also talked with CNN’s medical advisor, who wanted to make it clear that autism is neurological and not mental illness. He had one speaker who has researched and written a book about mass shootings, but no one is publicly making and stating the connection between medicational abuse and mass shootings.

    Someone like you with your credibility and creditenials would be recognized nationally for your position on the use and abuse of medication and its effects on adult behaviour and possible connecdtion in such mental illness-based shootings and tragedies. Please use your gifts and talents to make a difference in your country, as you already have in the educational field.

    Thank you for your work,
    Leonne Beebe

  5. Vanessa Peters

    This nightmare leaves me speechless. I honestly don’t know where to take a stand on this horrible tragedy. All I can think of is those poor babies and their traumatized parents and family. As to cause, aside from this young man being INSANE… having read a book called, “The Alphabet versus the Goddess” helped me to understand the origin and development of evil. In an over-simplified nutshell, the author of this book, Leonard Shlain, a neurosurgeon discusses in great detail, the evolution of feminine and masculine attributes and the absolute necessity of ongoing left and right brain balance to create a common sense. The values that typify the right brain include empathy, compassion, nonviolence; the values that typify the left brain include focus, power, aggression, cruelty and violence. What I gleaned from this work is that in our male dominated (hunter) society, bereft of the influence and/or constant connection to our feminine senses — comes a state of non-sense, and for some, as in the case of this tragedy… humans mentally become prey …

    Vanessa

  6. Debbie Scales

    I think it is premature to publish such an article but some valid points are made. Some the issues are that there is just enough time or teacher to go around a classroom where everyone is on a different pathway to the same goal. We try that at our school but it is stressing on the teachers. Every thing the students are expected to know by the end of the course are broken down into small, measurable goals and whatever that one student needs to do to accomplish each step is provided. It is very time consuming. Seems like it would be less stressful to have very small classes but then their is the money equation as well. Our school is a ministry of our parish and as such, our families do not pay tuition!

    I think these powerful drugs do need to be monitored better and the side effects and adverse effects need to be in writing and given not only to the client but a significant other who might notice these things before the client does.

  7. Isobel Rimmer

    It is indeed a terrible terrible tragedy. Caused by the ludicrous US system that makes it possible for someone (on or not on medication or suffering depression) to get access to ridiculous amounts of weapons and ammunition. The sooner Obama changes legislation in the US the better for the whole world.

    Isobel
    United Kingdom

  8. John Schaub

    How can one not be enraged by the horror of the latest school shooting in America. But as an observer from far away Australia, I sadly have to report that many people around me simply sigh and reluctantly ask why America chooses to be like this.

    We, in this country, are forever grateful for the many examples of right living that your great country has given the world since nationhood. Now could be the time for earnest reflection. Maybe the nation is somewhat blinded by its enviable successes and fails to notice shortcomings in its worsening affairs. Rightly or wrongly, America is increasingly perceived as in decline as a force for moral good.

    As an author, my hope is that you can influence public discourse and help your fellow countrymen to recapture a vision for the nation in preference to apportioning blame for its ills. This shooting is horrific. Maybe the answer does not lie in gun control at all, but on your nation’s reverence for power to the few over comprehensive civic inclusion.

    To paraphrase Maxwell Smart, an American hero of mine, ‘Use America’s energy for good and not evil!’ Change may be uncomfortable, but as America has proven so many times before, it can do anything it sincerely puts its mind to.
    Good luck,
    John Schaub FCSA

  9. Kristina Welch

    Hello Pat,

    I thought I’d respond how I felt about the Connecticut tragedy, complete and utter shock that someone would shoot and kill not just one child, but 20, including his own mother. I understand that his brother had nothing to do with the killing, but maybe he can help those in authority with his information about his troubled brother. I just think this world is becoming a colder place sometimes… There have been bomb threats in the region that I live recently, or at least dating back to a month. It’s like we all have shell shock from all this sad news, that’s how I feel. I pray for things to get under control or improved some how, but that day may be a while. We are in a deep valley but there are always higher places too and we should never forget that.

    Sincerely,
    Kristi Cowan (Welch)

  10. Laura Kelley

    Pat,

    Thanks for writing. I know emotional issues can be difficult to discuss.
    My personal opinion is that there isn’t anything that can be done. Our windows are not bullet proof – our doors can be crushed in by any vehicle at any time. If someone comes in to kill… All I can do is try to stay alive and keep the kids as safe as I can.

    I have six students who come from abusive homes, and no one does anything to help them. Their parents refusing support to make their lives better. Our whole country runs around numbing their pain with drugs- legal or otherwise.
    I am angry. I am not safe or protected – either are my students – and there is nothing I can do about it.

    My school doesn’t have enough money to buy paper. How can they protect us?

  11. Gergana Gerova

    Dear Pat,

    I’m sorry that all this happened – it’s a real tragedy. I’m so sorry for all the people who lost their lives but even more for the people who lost their children. I really can’t imagine how deep their grief is.

    I read what you have written and it’s very good. You are right about the harmful medication, but my opinion is that the problem is not only that.

    I live in a country in which it is almost impossible to possess your own weapon. In case you very much want to, you need to go through a psychological test and you must have an impeccable police record. Actually, there might be even more requirements, but, generally, it’s very difficult to get a gun, I mean to go buy it from a gun shop. I don’t say that you cannot find one illegally, but even so it’s hard. Maybe that’s a reason why there have been so many cases of school shooting in the States. In fact, I haven’t heard of so many in any other country. I know it’s hard to change the laws, but I believe this is something that may help – restrict to a maximum the free sale of any kind of gun.

    Besides, you are absolutely right about giving drugs to cure psychological problems, what is most necessary is therapy of some kind first. There are people with mental disorders everywhere, but the people who live with them should try to help them as soon as a problem has appeared in order to prevent such things from happening ever again.
    I hope my thoughts have been of some help to you.

    Best wishes,
    Gergana

  12. Dr. Lynn Deeb

    Am not certain what should be done but would always want to be a part of the dialogue. Dismantling the 2nd amendment, however, is not part of the solution.

  13. Rachel Rosas

    Pat,
    I agree about the medication and the mental illness but I also think the war video games black ops and modern warfare are also having an impact when combined together. Some kids play them around the clock shooting nonstop. Plus the stupid energy drinks probably don’t mix so well with the medications either.

  14. Dr. Collins Meek

    Dear Pat,

    I like what you have written about an “impossible” topic.

    You are so right to point to the “non-obvious” medication
    issue, when everybody else is either baffled or doing the
    “instant” gun control push.

    Thank you for writing about this tragedy so thoughtfully
    and so compassionately, Pat.

  15. Barb Cheuvront

    My frustration are the references to the shooter having Autism. My grandson has Autism and it breaks my heart that this children that are bullied and misunderstood will be associated with this tragedy. It is so difficult for families to have access to care because of the limitations placed by insurance companies.

    Anyone that knows about Autism know that they are so overwhelmed by the world, noises, touch, and other things that they would not be likely to walk into a busy school and do this.

    They would more likely be covering their ears or so many other coping mechanisms. I pray for my grandson and his siblings that they will be protected from these speculations. As a past elementary school teacher and currently a Registered Nurse, I pray for the families, the community, and the First Responders. Our state has lived through several tragedies in Colorado – it impacts us all.

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