What’s more cool than learning about STEM topics from a beautiful actress who’s also a real-life neuroscientist? Uh, not much. This summer, a group of New York City high school students are doing just that while they attend summer camps, workshops and competitions in Silicon Valley.

http://studyskills.com/products/?product=40Each experience is geared toward sparking students’ interest in STEM classes and offers individual modules geared toward developing skills in these areas – science, technology, engineering and math.

If your kids aren’t old enough to design mobile apps or “MacGuyver” a Morse code transmitter, you can download a new series of science videos and lessons designed by Texas Instruments with the National Academy of Sciences’ Science & Entertainment Exchange Program.

The videos and lessons, available at Stemhollywood.com, cover topics like zombies, superheroes and space. They feature Mayim Bialik, neuroscientist and actress from “The Big Bang Theory.” Bialik is joined by several leading scientists and mathematicians, including Dr. Steve Schlozman, a Harvard medical professor and zombie expert.

STEM Hollywood’s videos and lessons can be downloaded to tablets, PCs and Macs, as well as Texas Instruments’ TI-Nspire CX graphing calculator (pictured above).

Studying zombies is a great way to learn about how the human brain functions and to think about the way that contagious diseases spread in terms of math, according to Schlozman. But don’t worry about an actual zombie apocalypse happening.

“It won’t,” Schlozman said, “I want to be absolutely clear about that.”

Three rising sophomores attending Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School placed second in the first “Burn Notice” Science Challenge, a national competition inspired by USA network’s successful spy series.

According to Drew Tomback and twin brothers James and Hugh Savoldelli, friends and classmates are “kinda jealous.” The boys won $5,000 for their device: a set of garage door openers that they converted into Morse code transmitters and receivers. They designed a tool that “Burn Notice” characters could create using an everyday household item and that could be deployed quickly, they said.

“This allows spies to talk to each other through Morse code by using ordinary household products,” said Tomback. ”Obviously a portion of [the money] may be used towards college,” said Tomback, “and another will go to fund our future science projects.”

The competition was the brainchild of Matt Nix, creator and executive producer of “Burn Notice,” said Toby Graff, the senior vice president of public affairs at USA Network. The challenges were designed to be exciting and creative but also safe, she said. And the boys assured us that safety was the name of the game. “You can’t get your hand blown off doing this,” the boys said. See more of the challenge in their video.

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