Common core and critical thinking are very important to Amy Lawson. Her fifth-grade class needs to remember more thank just the plot of the story. 

Original-Amazing-GradesLawson wants her students to think more critically. She asks students to answer questions like, “What do you think this character might write to a friend?”

“It’s hard. But you can handle this,” Lawson informs them.

Welcome to a classroom using the Common Core State Standards, one of the most politicized and misunderstood changes in education for students and their teachers in kindergarten through high school.

In 45 states and the District of Columbia, Lawson and other teachers are starting to use the standards to guide what skills students learn and when.

To hear the standards’ critics — mainly tea party-aligned conservatives, but also some parents and teachers — tell it, there are few things more dangerous happening in the country.

But in this fast-growing community in northern Delaware, it’s just another day in the classroom.

The Common Core State Standards are academic benchmarks that outline the skills a student should have at each level.

For instance, third-graders should know how to find the perimeter of a figure. A fifth-grader should be able to compare and contrast two characters from a story.

The standards were created by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers to improve academic achievement and increase accountability. President Barack Obama and his administration embraced them.

That led critics, including Republican members of Congress, to call the standards a national curriculum, or “Obamacore.” The standards are not a curriculum, despite the opponents’ claims.

Each state, school or even teacher can determine how to help students reach those standards.

Alaska, Texas, Nebraska and Virginia decided not to adopt them. Minnesota has adopted only the English standards.

At the core of the standards is a reduced emphasis on memorization. Students now have to connect the dots and apply critical thinking. It’s what experts call higher-order thinking.

Teachers say it’s preparing students for life after high school.

That has made classrooms much more of a hands-on proposition.

Continue reading Common Core academic standards force teachers to work on critical thinking over memorization.

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Common Core and Critical Thinking