A global citizenship program for high school students aims to create students who succeed in a global society.

At Norwood High School the program is being received with excited anticipation.  “It remains an exciting and enriching opportunity for our students at Norwood High School,” said Norwood High Principal George Usevich at a recent School Committee meeting. “Public schools must prepare our young children to understand and address global issues and educators must re-examine their teaching strategies as well as the curriculum so that all students can thrive in this global and interdependent society.”
Global Citizenship Program for High School Students

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In the fall, the Global Citizenship program will begin at Norwood High.  According to Foreign Language chairman Cynthia Derrane, the program will have two major components.  A Global Citizenship Club and a Global Citizenship certification will afford students the opportunity to participate as club members or become more involved for the certification.  The club is open to all students, but certification requires that students maintain a B- average, complete one club activity per term, and participate on 20 hours of service with some foreign travel.

These global courses include the various history courses and foreign languages courses already offered at Norwood High School. No new classes are being added.
“We are excited because we feel it is an exciting opportunity for students who are interested to really engage in 21st century skills,” Derrane said.

Global Citizenship Program for High School Students

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This foreign travel component does not necessarily mean the student has to travel to a foreign country, Derrane said. Students can receive credit for a comparable activity, such as hosting a foreign student. They’ll have the opportunity to do that in fall, as 30 students from Southern, Spain will visit Norwood from Sept. 4 to 25 this year.
If hosting these students go well, an exchange program is something the school would consider in the years ahead, Derrane said.