Despite recruitment efforts, fewer women are entering STEM fields, and college educators are examining women’s perceptions of their abilities.

Fewer Women are Entering the STEM Fields

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Women make up half the college educated workforce, but only 28 percent of those women are employed in science and engineering positions. That proportion has only increased by 5 percent since 1993, as stated in the National Science Board’s 2014 Science and Engineering Indicators report.

Ashley Cordell finds that she is surrounded by male colleagues at her IT services job at Rural Sourcing Inc.  “To know that you can successfully navigate through a career choice that is predominantly male is an accomplishment and something to be proud of,” she said.

Cordell initially studied radiation therapy in college. During her coursework, she realized that she was more interested in the technology rather than the practice of radiation therapy.

“It is something that I love to do, but I also think that maybe a lot of women don’t take into consideration all the benefits of going into a STEM discipline,” the 30-year-old said. “If you are considering quality of life with your family, I definitely recommend the STEM disciplines because it provides better hours, a little more flexibility.”

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Fewer Women are Entering the STEM Fields

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