A recent study found a relationship between weakened social relationships and ADHD.

Social Relationships and ADHD

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The study from Norway found that the cycle of peer rejection worsened symptoms early in life, but the cycle diminished in later years.

“Restless kids tend to be less attractive as play partners, due to their problems with sustaining attention to rules, being alert to other kids’ ideas and a limited understanding of turn-taking,” said study author Frode Stenseng. He is an associate professor at the Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare at Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

“Parents or teachers should — at least when it comes to preschool children — try to guide such children in their social play so that they are not so easily excluded,” Stenseng added.

“Although we have long known that children with ADHD are at increased risk for peer rejection, it is surprising that earlier peer rejection seems to lead down the road to greater ADHD symptoms, suggesting a bi-directional relationship between ADHD symptoms and social functioning,” commented Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York, in New Hyde Park, N.Y.

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Social Relationships and ADHD

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